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SAU GC Head

Are you currently attending St. Ambrose University? Are you currently a Staff Member or Faculty member at St. Ambrose University? Have you been impacted by cancer? If you answered yes, please consider joining our mission!

Our Why: The Young Adult (YA) population ranges in age from 20-39, with 60,000+ new diagnoses each year. This presents a unique challenge because YA’s are stranded between adolescent and adult life stages. Changes that come with young adulthood such as completing school, securing employment, advancing one’s career, finding a partner, starting a family, and (often) caring for aging parents are often the challenges of what you may be experiencing. According to the Cancer Experience Registry, 75% of YAs worry about the future and what lies ahead and 56% experience changes or disruptions in work, school, or home life. Gilda’s Club Quad Cities wants to provide support to this population and we think Gilda’s Club University at SAU might be the perfect way.

Our Model:

Ensure cancer awareness through marketing, events, and a CSC/GC Media Toolkit

Provide cancer resources, education, and workshops

Host professionally led peer support groups tailored to help address YA needs & experiences

Host social networking events

Coordinate an annual fundraising event to support the chapter’s initiatives

Our Ask: This is where you come in. We are looking for students/faculty/staff to help us reach our mission of serving more young adults impacted by cancer. If you’re interested in joining the initiative or serving in one of the officer positions, please reach out to vicente@gildasclubqc.org for more information.

About Us: Gilda’s Club Quad Cities offers workshops, professionally-led support groups, healthy lifestyle activities and social events — all provided at no charge — for men, women, and children whose lives have been impacted by cancer. Our program is designed to help people with cancer and their friends and family deal with the physical, psychological and emotional challenges of cancer.